Wrap-Up: Three Days, Three Quotes Challenge (#3)

Hey guys! Thanks for the overwhelming responses I’ve received for my last two parts. You guys are the best. Finally, I have come to the end of the quotes challenge. (Sorry it came late again, I tampered with something on my site. shaiima.wordpress.com is the new blog address, sorry for any inconvenience this might cause).

PS: That’s what I get for being too curious.

Rules of the challenge:

  • Three quotes for three days.
  • Three nominees each day (no repetition).
  • Thank the person who nominated you.
  • Inform the nominees.

Now on to my third and final quote of this challenge:

“Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin, as self-neglecting.”

Origin of the Quote:

Anyone who is deftly familiar with Shakespeare’s works would know exactly where this quote came from (Henry V; Act II Scene IV).Henry was a man of war. These words (the quote) were spoken by Dauphin (son of the king of France) to the King (his father) when a messenger from Henry V brought a message to him. In the message,  he said England lays claim to certain lands of France. Dauphin advised the King to stand his ground. He advised his father to defend his crown against the English..and the story continues.

What It Means:

There’s a this popular mantra that “you can’t give what you don’t have “. Somehow, you’d be wondering what this has to do with the quote.

Here’s how they relate; one can’t truly love others without first loving oneself. If you neglect yourself, you neglect others too.

Wondering how true these are? Let’s cite an example; X is an undergraduate who is struggling to raise his CGPA to one that won’t send him packingo despite his brilliance. Few years before, he lost both his parents in a car crash. Two months back, his confidant left him after avoiding him for several weeks. He hates himself so much that sometimes, he cuts himself to redirect his pains and to look hideous. Y decides this is the time to ask him to help solve a calculus question and walks up to him. I know this is a trashy example but what do you think his reaction would be? (I’d leave the rest to your imagination).

People are open to assisting others when they’re  fine themselves. The level of happiness of some individuals determine the extent to which they can go in caring about others. 

There are and have always been exceptions to the rule though. Some people, despite their challenges, care really deeply about others. 

Bottom line: lead a happy life no matter what happens to you, love yourself and stay happy so you can have the strength to love others as fiercely too.

Nominees:

These blogs are owned by awesomely talented people. 

While it would be wonderful if you accept this, it’s not a compulsion. I’m curious as to what your quotes would be in the event that you accept this. (Thanks).

    Whew! Finally.

    Enjoy the rest of the week everyone. ♥

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    Three Days, Three Quotes Challenge (#2)

    So I hope you guys loved the first quote and at least gained something from it.

    Rules of the challenge (as usual):

    • Three quotes for three days.
    • Three nominees each day (no repetition).
    • Thank the person who nominated you.
    • Inform the nominees.

    Now on to the second quote of this challenge:

     If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough. – Ellen Johnson Sirleaf


    Origin of the Quote:

    This quote was culled from the commencement speech Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (the 24th Liberian President, the world’s first elected female black president and  Africa’s first elected head of state) made at her alma mater (Harvard University ), which coincided with the 375th Anniversary of the University.

    The size of your dreams must always exceed your current capacity to achieve them. If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough. If you start off with a small dream, you may not have much left when it is fulfilled because along the way, life will task your dreams and make demands on you.


    What It Means:

    I believe the message this quote brings is quite easy to understand. Dream big and work towards it. 

    Irrespective of what life passes to you, don’t be afraid to want something bigger and better. Don’t let your will to soar dwindle just because you haven’t achieved anything yet. Your struggles only make you a better, prudent person. Your experiences makes you wiser and your success,  you fashion out creative ways to even better things (all these with the help of God). Hardwork, Prayers, Perseverance and Persistence would go a long way in helping you work towards that monumental dream.

    Dream big and Go for it!!!

    Nominees:

      I’m sorry this was a little behind schedule. Do bear with “her”.

      And the game continues…




        Three Days, Three Quotes Challenge (#1)

        Thank you my fellow “desserts” dispenser again for this curiosity-inclined nomination (haha curiosity kills the cat but I guess yours have nine lives). Wanderlust is one of the blogs I have come to realize I look forward to opening everyday. Your multiple unrelated posts in a day still won’t cease to amaze me. Thanks a lot. (Tell me what that translates to in the Filipino language so I can use that next time haha)

         Rules of the challenge:

        • Three quotes for three days.
        • Three nominees each day(no repetition).
        • Thank the person who nominated you.
        • Inform the nominees.

        Now my first quote for the three days quotes challenge:

        “Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive.” – Sir  Walter Scott.

        Just like the nominator, mine’s going to be a tad different. Strict rules are boring, glad I’m not the only one that thinks that.

        Origin of the Quote:

        This quote was forged from Marmion; (A Tale of Flodden Field) by Walter Scott Esq. This epic book was published in 1808. 

        This line comes from Canto VI, XVII in the play. In the story, Lord Marmion is trying to win the favor of a rich lady, Clara de Clare. This lady was already involved with someone else, but Marmion decided to use his position to go forward anyway. He accused the lady’s suitor, Sir Ralph de Wilton, of treason. De Wilton has to then flee the country after a duel. Later, Marmion dies in battle, and Wilton comes back and marries the lady.

        What It Means:

        This quote simply explains the complex disastrous effects of lying. For a person to lie, he has to have a number of cooked up stories in his head which he has to keep track of to keep the lies going. 

        Lying for a fact, has unforeseen consequences. One might tell hitherto “harmless” lies that end up destroying things, people and relationships. Bottom line is, lying leads to successive lies and more chaos.

        I remember this from somewhere I can’t recollect;

        “Tell a lie once and all your truths become questionable”.

        Lying not only destroys a lot of things, it destroys the person too in the long run especially when the truth surfaces. People think twice or even five times before believing any statement that comes from him. He loses respect and his personality has that tag “liar” imprinted on it. Life is so much more beautiful and peaceful when there’s a lot of honesty in play. Yes; the truth, they say, is bitter but would you rather tell the truth and seek forgiveness or tell a lie and lose yourself?

        Nominees: 

          Visit these blogs and let their works speak for themselves. 

          And so to borrow from a fellow blogger who borrowed from a fellow blogger and a follower (lol), let the games begin…